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Blog Articles: Do Single People Need Estate Planning?

Do Single People Need Estate Planning?
If you don’t have a spouse or children, you might think you don’t need to do much estate planning. However, if you have any assets, familial connections, or interest in supporting charitable groups – not to mention a desire to control your own future – you do need to establish an estate plan.

Do single people need estate planning?  According to Beck & Lenox Estate Planning & Elder Law, LLC, every independent adult should have an estate plan. In evaluating your needs for estate planning, look at what might happen if you die intestate – that is, without a last will and testament. Your assets will likely have to go through the probate process, which means they’ll be distributed by the court according to the state intestate succession laws, says Hood County News’ recent article entitled “Even ‘singles’ need estate plans.”

Even if you do not have children to be concerned with, you may have a few nephews or nieces—or children of cousins or friends— to whom you would like to leave some of your assets. This can include automobiles, collectibles and family memorabilia. However, if everything you own goes through probate, there is no guarantee that these individuals will end up with what you wanted them to have.

If you want to leave something to family members or close friends, you will need to say this in your will. However, you also may want to provide support to one or more charitable organizations. You can just name these charities in your will. However, there may be options that could provide you with more benefits.

One option is a charitable remainder trust. With this option, you would transfer appreciated assets – such as stocks, mutual funds or other securities – into an irrevocable trust. The trustee, whom you have named (note that you could serve as trustee yourself) can then sell the assets at full market value, avoiding the capital gains taxes you would have to pay if you sold them yourself, outside a trust. If you itemize, you may be able to claim a charitable deduction on your taxes. The trust can purchase income-producing assets with the proceeds and provide you with an income stream for the rest of your life. At your death, the remaining trust assets will pass to the charities you have named.

There is also a third entity that is part of your estate plans: you. Everyone should make arrangements to protect their interests. However, without an immediate family, you need to be especially mindful of your financial and health care decisions. That is why, as part of your estate planning, you may want to include these two documents: durable power of attorney for finances and a health care proxy (Beck & Lenox uses the term medical power of attorney).

A durable power of attorney allows you to name a person to manage your finances, if you become incapacitated. This is especially important for anyone who does not have a spouse. If you become incapacitated, your health care proxy (health care surrogate or medical power of attorney) lets you name another person to legally make health care decisions for you, if you cannot do so yourself. A medical power of attorney can also designate if you want to make organ donations and also, who you may want to assign to make your funeral and burial arrangements.

It is important to get at least some basic estate planning done as soon as possible because you never know what the future holds for you. Do single people need estate planning? According to Beck & Lenox, if they are not incapacitated, yes, they do.

Reference: Hood County News (Dec. 17, 2021) “Even ‘singles’ need estate plans”

 

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