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Blog Articles: Educating Women about Long-Term Care

Elder Law Attorney, Medicare, Medicaid, Paying for a Nursing Home, Long-Term Care Planning, Medicaid Nursing Home Planning, Assisted Living, Nursing Home Care, Medicaid Planning Lawyer, Social Security, Elder Care, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney, Financial Planning, Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease
Women face unique challenges as they age. According to the Population Reference Bureau, a Washington-based think tank, women live about seven years more than men. Living longer means planning for a longer retirement.

Based upon client experiences and needs, Beck & Lenox Estate Planning & Elder Law, LLC, has a goal of educating women about long-term care. A longer retirement increases the odds of needing long-term care. An AARP study found more than 70% of nursing home residents were women, says Kiplinger’s recent article entitled “A Woman’s Guide to Long-Term Care.”

Living longer also increases the chances of living it alone because living longer may mean outliving a spouse. According to the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, “In 2018, women comprised 74% of solo households age 80 and over.”

The first step is to review retirement projections. It’s wise to look at “what-if” scenarios: What-if the husband passes early? How does that impact their retirement? What if a female client lives to 100? Will she have enough to live on? What if a single woman needs long-term care for dementia? Alzheimer’s and dementia can last for years, eating up a retiree’s nest egg.

Medicare and Medicaid. Government programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are complicated. For instance, Medicare may cover some long-term care expenses, but only for the first 100 days for purposes of rehabilitation. Medicare doesn’t pay for custodial care (at home long-term care). Medicaid pays for long-term care. However, you must qualify financially.

Planning for long-term care. If a woman has a high retirement success rate, she may want to self-insure her future long-term care expenses. This can mean setting up a designated long-term care investment account solely to be used for future long-term care expenses. If a woman has a modest degree of retirement success, she may want to lower her current expenses to save more for the future. She may also want to look at long-term care insurance.

Social Security. Women can also think about waiting to claim Social Security until age 70. If women live longer, the extra benefits accrued by waiting can help with long-term care. Women with a higher-earning husband may want to ask the higher-earning spouse to delay until age 70, if possible. When the higher-earning spouse dies, the widow can step into the higher benefit. The average break-even age is generally around 77-83 for Social Security. If an individual can live longer than 83, the more dollars and sense it makes to delay collecting until age 70.

Estate Planning. Having a comprehensive estate plan is a must. Women (and men) should have a power of attorney (POA). A POA gives a trusted agent the ability to write checks and send money to pay for long-term care.

Educating women about long-term care not only prepares them better for the possibility of needing it in the future, but also lets them begin some planning now to protect themselves, according to Beck & Lenox. Find a good elder law attorney to review what estate planning has already been done, with an eye to likely needing long-term care in the future.  Along with new insurance products that help with those costs, eligibility for government programs such as Medicaid and Veterans pensions can be reviewed as well.

Reference: Kiplinger (July 11, 2021) “A Woman’s Guide to Long-Term Care”

 

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